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‘Unmarketing’ by Scott Stratten

Unmarketing

Stop Marketing. Start Engaging.

There’s a very good reason that some of the the marketing ideas Scott Stratten has presented in his book ‘Unmarketing’ were picked up by people like FastCompany and the Wall Street Journal – because they are entertaining, fresh and most of them will work for most people!

According to Scott, ‘Unmarketing’ is something quite different to conventional or traditional marketing – he defines ‘Unmarketing’ as ‘the ability to engage with your market’.  According to him “if you believe business is built on relationships” you should “make building them your business” – and that’s the focus of his book.

I love what I describe as ‘bathroom books’ (enough to have written the ‘Bathroom Business Bible’ a few years back).  A bathroom book is one where the information is presented in bite-sized chunks that are quick and easy to digest – ‘single sitting strategies’ as I called them in my offering.

Unmarketing is just like that: it has 56 short chapters – covering just about every possible aspect of the challenge facing anyone whose responsibility it is to engage with clients.  Appropriately it spends a lot of time talking about the role of Social Marketing in a modern marketing mix (Scott is a Twitter guru who makes not too shabby use of LinkedIn and FaceBook too).

Each of the 56 chapters are focused sharply on a single topic, get quickly to the point, and present examples of where the idea presented in the chapter has been applied successfully.  More importantly most of the chapters also present you with the ‘how to’ actions so you can put the theory into practice. This is how all books should be – I hate pure theory.

Published at the end of 2010 this book has a very fresh feel to it (unlike a lot of the other marketing books knocking around – which are a few years too early to have been able to competently discuss the place of Social Media in the marketing mix)

A colleague who read this at the same time as me found his style of writing a tad irritating – it’s very much a monologue from a man one might describe as having ‘a robust self-image’.  I didn’t notice (I wonder is that because I’m the same?).

For all that Unmarketing is one of those great reads that gives you lots of ideas and, if you’re in the business of building client relationships (and aren’t we all?), anything that provides new ideas is most welcome.

This is definitely worth a look – at time of writing Amazon has it reduced to $14.41 for the hardback and it’s just $11.99 for the Kindle version (I found it a perfect Kindle edition).  You can also get it on Audible in unabridged audio form for a great value $17.95.

8/10 – Very much worth a read.

 

Have you read this?  Any thoughts?

Anything similar you’d recommend?  (use the Comments feature to contribute)

  • Robust self-image eh? Nicest way I’ve been described all week! 🙂 thanks for the review Deiric. I really appreciate it.

    • Thanks for stopping by Scott! I’m in the process of implementing several of your ideas: I particularly like your 3-video approach to upping subscription opt-in confirmations.

      Have had good numbers reading the piece – but no comments to date (in fact comments are low all around). All advice appreciated – any thoughts on how to encourage more comments. Again, thanks for stopping by

  • Robust self-image eh? Nicest way I’ve been described all week! 🙂 thanks for the review Deiric. I really appreciate it.

    • Thanks for stopping by Scott! I’m in the process of implementing several of your ideas: I particularly like your 3-video approach to upping subscription opt-in confirmations.

      Have had good numbers reading the piece – but no comments to date (in fact comments are low all around). All advice appreciated – any thoughts on how to encourage more comments. Again, thanks for stopping by